Qrygma

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This article is an entry from the Netseran Encyclopaedia edited by Hadrian Mar Elijah Bar Israel. You can log in or request an account to make changes..

קרגמא

Flow” in Aramaic, but is also used to refer to “tradition”.


There is no term for “tradition” in Aramaic, so instead it is referred to as the qyrgma, the “current” or “flow” of faith, moving forward which carries us forward through time. It is the river flow of faith that is unending, and whose path changes over time; which erodes the stubborn stone over which it runs; turning once proud stone into river mud and sediments.

Qrygma is the word that means “flow” in Aramaic, but is also used to refer to “tradition”. It is the river flow of faith that is unending, and whose path changes over time; which erodes the stubborn stone over which it runs; turning once proud stone into river mud and sediments. And in fact the concept of a "tradition" as a canonical philosophy, written down and codified into specific legal texts, is washed clean when qyrgma is fully understood as a constant, moving, revelation of of God revealed to His people through the Spirit of Holiness. It is the unrolling of both past and future, like a Torah scroll, where only the present revelation is visible, but both the past and future remain in hand.

As everyone practiced in law knows, there is an argument to break any law based on understanding the underlying bases for it. A traffic ticket can be wiped clean by the flow of common sense, if it is understood by the court that a greater danger to the public would have ensued if the law had not been broken. In the same way the rigid and legalistic “canons” of the Byzantine churches do not apply to the Semitic qrygma, because the flow of thoughts always regress to first causes, and foundational principles, rather that to rules and philosophies.

It is strange for one living within the Nazarani qrygma to listen to Europeans quoting each other, in order to prove some point or another; rather than seeking out the thoughts of the Early Church fathers, the Bible or Jesus’s own words, as the source of their ‘tradition’. First principles mean everything, and some guy from two hundred years ago, wise as he might have been, doesn’t have the ability to get any better answer than we have to-day from examining the same original sources. Which of course, we have better access to, because unlike him, we are living in the Information Age.

Europe’s greatness is gone, and America’s greatness is fading fast. Meanwhile the real world, the developing world, is seeking answers to the questions that the Europeans and their descendents’ assumptions and traditions have failed to give - answers to the basic questions about God and Life, who we are, and why we’re here.

The Nazarani qrygma of course has no problem answer such questions. They are in fact fundamental to what it means to be Nazarani (a branch of the vine) in the first place.

Those influenced by the Greeks (i.e. all of western Christianity) are left wondering whether or not Jesus is even “God”, since the Greek redaction of the Bible doesn’t explicitly say He was. The Peshitta, which is the original Bible, written in Yerusalami Aramaic does however state explicitly that Yeshue is “Mar YAH”. In Aramaic “Mar” means “Lord”, and “YAH”, the Aramaic for what in Hebrew is written “YHVH”, also means “Life”. So Jesus is “Lord Life”, the source, and is therefore One with the father, He is the “Only-Begotten”, which in Aramaic is “ichidaya”, and means “singleness”, and the “Miltha”, which in Aramaic means “word”, “substance”, “instance” and “occurrence” of the Father… In Aramaic he refers to Himself multiple times in the Aramaic New Testament as “ina na”, or “I am that I am”, indicating that He claimed to be God Himself, not merely alluding to it as it says in the Greek.

"It is the river flow of faith that is unending, and whose path changes over time; which erodes the stubborn stone over which it runs; turning once proud stone into river mud and sediments."

And in fact the concept of a "tradition" as a canonical philosophy, written down and codified into specific legal texts, is washed clean when qyrgma is fully understood as a constant, moving, revelation of of God revealed to His people through the Spirit of Holiness. It is the unrolling of both past and future, like a Torah scroll, where only the present revelation is visible, but both the past and future remain in hand.

It is strange for one living within the Nazarani qrygma to listen to Europeans quoting each other, in order to prove some point or another; rather than seeking out the thoughts of the Early Church fathers, the Bible or Jesus’s own words, as the source of their ‘tradition’. First principles mean everything, and some guy from two hundred years ago, wise as he might have been, doesn’t have the ability to get any better answer than we have to-day from examining the same original sources. Which of course, we have better access to, because unlike him, we are living in the Information Age.

Europe’s greatness is gone, and America’s greatness is fading fast. Meanwhile the real world, the developing world, is seeking answers to the questions that the Europeans and their descendants’ assumptions and traditions have failed to give - answers to the basic questions about God and Life, who we are, and why we’re here.

The Nazarani qrygma of course has no problem answer such questions. They are in fact fundamental to what it means to be Nazarani (a branch of the vine) in the first place.

Those influenced by the Greeks (i.e. all of western Christianity) are left wondering whether or not Jesus is even “God”, since the Greek redaction of the Bible doesn’t explicitly say He was. The Peshitta, which is the original Bible, written in Yerusalami Aramaic does however state explicitly that Yeshue is “Mar YAH”. In Aramaic “Mar” means “Lord”, and “YAH”, the Aramaic for what in Hebrew is written “YHVH”, also means “Life”. So Jesus is “Lord Life”, the source, and is therefore One with the father, He is the “Only-Begotten”, which in Aramaic is “ichidaya”, and means “singleness”, and the “Miltha”, which in Aramaic means “word”, “substance”, “instance” and “occurrence” of the Father… In Aramaic he refers to Himself multiple times in the Aramaic New Testament as “ina ina”, or “I am that I am”, indicating that He claimed to be God Himself, not merely alluding to it as it says in the Greek.